1. Reblogged from: 9to5justtostayalive
  2. neruda-bro:

    ofc banksy didn’t get arrested lol that’s the whole point of him… he’s some white guy practicing an art Black and Latino men get penalized for producing by making shallow critiques of capitalism and getting away with it and “elevating” it lol

    Reblogged from: indragamano
  3. Reblogged from: deniablesmiles
  4. blackfashion:

Yvonne Ben, Sudbury ON
#Flashback to Sudbury’s Fall Back Music and Arts Festival 2013! Rocking Severe Nature’s WildCats Tee from their Summer 2013 Collection! Visit http://wp.me/p1MKHe-4db to see more!

    blackfashion:

    Yvonne Ben, Sudbury ON

    #Flashback to Sudbury’s Fall Back Music and Arts Festival 2013! Rocking Severe Nature’s WildCats Tee from their Summer 2013 Collection! Visit http://wp.me/p1MKHe-4db to see more!

    Reblogged from: blackfashion
  5. blkpussesupreme:

     Yall see Janet hitting the nae nae though?

    Reblogged from: 3rdeyera
  6. blackhistoryeveryday:

blackfeminism:

smithsonianfolklife:

The dap, the fist bump, the black power handshake. It goes by many names and carries many meanings. Photographer LaMont Hamilton is devoting his research fellowship with us to unearthing stories about the dap for his project Five on the Black Hand Side.
Read about the dap’s history and evolution on Talk Story: http://bit.ly/1odnKKM.

they called the “terrorist fist jab” on fox

The dap originated during the late 1960s among black G.I.s stationed in the Pacific during the Vietnam War. At a time when the Black Power movement was burgeoning, racial unrest was prominent in American cities, and draft reforms sent tens of thousands of young African Americans into combat, the dap became an important symbol of unity and survival in a racially turbulent atmosphere. Scholars on the Vietnam War and black Vietnam vets alike note that the dap derived from a pact black soldiers took in order to convey their commitment to looking after one another. Several unfortunate cases of black soldiers reportedly being shot by white soldiers during combat served as the impetus behind this physical act of solidarity.
Such events, combined with the racism and segregation faced by black G.I.s, created a pressing need for an act and symbol of unity. The dap, an acronym for “dignity and pride” whose movements translate to “I’m not above you, you’re not above me, we’re side by side, we’re together,” provided just this symbol of solidarity and served as a substitute for the Black Power salute prohibited by the military.
White soldiers and commanding officers deemed the handshake a threat under the misconception that the dap was a coded language of potential black insurrection. In fact the dap was also a coded form of communication between soldiers that conveyed necessary information for survival, such as what to expect at the battlefront or what had transpired during an operation. The dap was banned at all levels of the military, and thus many black soldiers were court-martialed, jailed, and even dishonorably discharged as a punishment for dapping. Military repression of the dap further cemented a desire for a symbol of solidarity and protection among black men.

    blackhistoryeveryday:

    blackfeminism:

    smithsonianfolklife:

    The dap, the fist bump, the black power handshake. It goes by many names and carries many meanings. Photographer LaMont Hamilton is devoting his research fellowship with us to unearthing stories about the dap for his project Five on the Black Hand Side.

    Read about the dap’s history and evolution on Talk Story: http://bit.ly/1odnKKM.

    they called the “terrorist fist jab” on fox

    The dap originated during the late 1960s among black G.I.s stationed in the Pacific during the Vietnam War. At a time when the Black Power movement was burgeoning, racial unrest was prominent in American cities, and draft reforms sent tens of thousands of young African Americans into combat, the dap became an important symbol of unity and survival in a racially turbulent atmosphere. Scholars on the Vietnam War and black Vietnam vets alike note that the dap derived from a pact black soldiers took in order to convey their commitment to looking after one another. Several unfortunate cases of black soldiers reportedly being shot by white soldiers during combat served as the impetus behind this physical act of solidarity.

    Such events, combined with the racism and segregation faced by black G.I.s, created a pressing need for an act and symbol of unity. The dap, an acronym for “dignity and pride” whose movements translate to “I’m not above you, you’re not above me, we’re side by side, we’re together,” provided just this symbol of solidarity and served as a substitute for the Black Power salute prohibited by the military.

    White soldiers and commanding officers deemed the handshake a threat under the misconception that the dap was a coded language of potential black insurrection. In fact the dap was also a coded form of communication between soldiers that conveyed necessary information for survival, such as what to expect at the battlefront or what had transpired during an operation. The dap was banned at all levels of the military, and thus many black soldiers were court-martialed, jailed, and even dishonorably discharged as a punishment for dapping. Military repression of the dap further cemented a desire for a symbol of solidarity and protection among black men.

    Reblogged from: mockingturtles
  7. babygoatsandfriends:

Braeview Pygmy goats
    Reblogged from: dynastylnoire
  8. hallowoeon:

    This is a pitch video for my Mechanical Engineering senior design class. We’re making an exhibit for the Madison Children’s Museum. Please look at this and see if it’s interesting enough or fun enough that you and/or kids that you know would play on it.

    If you could also spread it far and wide, I would appreciate it muchly!

    Reblogged from: hallowoeon
  9. fxrted:

X

    fxrted:

    X

    Reblogged from: putridpeaches
  10. imokhuede:

    Radiohead — Everything in Its Right Place

    Reblogged from: imokhuede
  11. I’m going to reblog that plenty of times, join me

  12. This is a pitch video for my Mechanical Engineering senior design class. We’re making an exhibit for the Madison Children’s Museum. Please look at this and see if it’s interesting enough or fun enough that you and/or kids that you know would play on it.

    If you could also spread it far and wide, I would appreciate it muchly!

  13. brownpeopleproblems:

    Here is a difference. Black/Brown/Yellow face is used to humiliate. White face is packaged in a bottle, marketed as a key for success and labelled Fair and Lovely. And it sells.

    Reblogged from: afghangster
  14. tiit:

    worldcvp:

    ALEXANDER WANG SS 2013 RUNWAY MUSIC FROM MERCEDES BENZ FASHION WEEK

    Tracks include: Put Cha Back In It by DJ Sliink | Yaow by Baauer | Bonkers by Jay Fay & Ra Calium | Harlem Shake by Baauer | Epic by Sandro Silva & Quintino

    i used to strut my 5’0” ass to class to this soundtrack every day. i need to put this back into circulation 

    Reblogged from: mockingturtles
  15. wetheurban:

    DESIGN: The Morphing FES Watch by Takt Project

    The FES Watch steps up the game for e-ink watches, using electronic paper not just on the dial, but across the entire strap.

    Read More

    Reblogged from: wetheurban
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